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COLEMAN, JAMES L., JR., Amoco Production Company, Houston, TX

ABSTRACT: Geology of Deep-Water Sandstones in the Mississippi Stanley Shale at Cossatot Falls, Arkansas

The Mississippian Stanley Shale crops out along the Cossatot River in the Ouachita Mountains of western Arkansas. Here, exposures of deep-water sandstones and shales, on recently established public lands, present a rare, three-dimensional look at sandstones of the usually obscured Stanley. Cossatot Falls, within the Cossatot River State Park Natural Area, is a series of class IV and V rapids developed on massive- to medium-bedded quartz sandstones on the northern flank of an asymmetric, thrust-faulted anticline.

In western Arkansas, the Stanley Shale is a 10,000-ft (3200-m) succession of deep-water sandstone and shale. At Cossatot Falls,

approximately 50 ft (155 m) of submarine-fan-channel sedimentary rocks are exposed during low-river stages. This section is composed primarily of sets of thinning-upward sandstone beds. With rare exceptions, the sandstones are turbidites, grading from massive, homogeneous, basal beds upward through festoon-cross-bedded thick beds, into rippled medium and thin beds. Sandstone sets are capped by thin shales and siltstones. Regional, north-northwestward paleocurrent indicators are substantiated by abundant, generally east-west ripple crests asymmetric to the north-northwest. Flute casts at the top of the sandstone sequence indicate an additional east-west flow component.

Based on regional, lithologic characteristics, the sandstones at Cossatot Falls appear to be within the Moyers Formation. The Moyers is the upper sandstone unit of the Stanley and is an oil and gas reservoir in the eastern Oklahoma Ouachita Mountains.

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90989©1993 GCAGS and Gulf Coast SEPM 43rd Annual Meeting, Shreveport, Louisiana, October 20-22, 1993.