--> --> Seismic Geomorphology of Submarine Channel-Belt Complexes in the Pliocene Succession of the Levant Basin, Offshore Central Israel

2018 AAPG International Conference and Exhibition

Datapages, Inc.Print this page

Seismic Geomorphology of Submarine Channel-Belt Complexes in the Pliocene Succession of the Levant Basin, Offshore Central Israel

Abstract

In this study, we combine the analysis of a high-resolution, three-dimensional seismic reflection dataset and well-log data, to characterize a distinct Pliocene interval in the Levant Basin, offshore central Israel. This succession is characterized by moderate to high-amplitude and discontinuous to continuous seismic reflections sandwiched between a mass transport deposit above and an underlying undeformed basin series. Our results show the studied interval is composed of two disparate channelized subunits. Morphologically, the channels trend N-NW direction, incised <50 m and widened ~50 m to 350 m, increasing in their quantity upwards. We also identified a vertical variation in channel morphology style and stratigraphic organization through integrated analysis of seismic and well log data. Our results show that the lower parts of each subunits are dominated by a coarser grained, narrow V-shaped channels (average width <120 m and low sinuosity indices, SI <1.06). In contrast, the upper parts of each subunits are predominantly fine-grained and U-shaped with relatively wide channels (average width >230 m and higher sinuosity indices, SI >1.1). An indication of a cyclic pattern in the mechanisms that control the interplay between sedimentary processes and channel evolution through time in the study area. Considering the cyclic occurrence of different types of channels and estimated age of the studied interval, formation and evolutionary processes of the submarine channels in the study area are likely to be controlled by relative sea level fluctuations, and increased Nile River sediment supply associated with quick uplift of the Ethiopian plateau and increased African Monsoon rainfall during the Pliocene.