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Depositional Systems of Carbonates, Role and Contribution in Improving Hydrocarbon Productivity, Zeit Bay Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

El-Badawy, Bassem A.1; Selim, Saber M.1; Abdallah, Khaled M.1
1 Exploration, Suez Oil Company, Mohandseen, Egypt.

Depositional system recognization plays an important role in defining, in a comprehensive manner, the details distribution of reservoir rocks and fluids content with the ultimate goal of a reservoir management scheme. This recognization aims to provide facts, information and knowledge necessary to control production operations and to optimally develop any oil field by obtaining the maximum possible economic recovery from the reservoir units. Also, it helps in the reservoir characterization modeling process which embodies the integration of the technical disciplines of the exploration and the development phase of the oil field. Existing test and production data are also used to develop a better understanding of reservoir dynamics and to improve the depositional model of the reservoir.

This study describes the Carbonate Reservoir Depositional Model of Zeit Bay field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The field represents one of the complicated oil fields as it comprises several reservoirs in complete hydraulic communication, making it one of the unique reservoirs. Hydrocarbons are produced from all the porous and permeable intervals from Hammam Faraun member of Belayim Formation down to Pre-Cambrian Fracture Basement.

All available data and techniques were used to construct this model aiming to:

1) Maximize profitability from the hydrocarbon reserves.

2) Identify and model of carbonate reservoir unit that predicts the content and the production behavior of wells.

3) Explain the past carbonate reservoir performance and predict the future performance of the field.

4) Formulate a plan for the development of the carbonate reservoir in the field.

 

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90090©2009 AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition, Denver, Colorado, June 7-10, 2009