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Miller, Byron1, Chacko J. John1, Brian Harder1, Reed Bourgeois1 
(1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

ABSTRACT: The University Oil and Gas Field; Hydrocarbons, Reservoirs, and Future Potential 

The University Field, located in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is a large subsurface domal structure that has produced over 52 MMBO + 97 BCFG since discovery in 1938. Approximately 20 sands ranging from Miocene to Oligocene age produced oil and gas at subsurface depths of - 4400' to - 9900'. Reservoir stratigraphy is variable, resulting in a number of thin, stratigraphically trapped hydrocarbon accumulations, suggesting structural uplift contemporaneous with reservoir deposition. Annual production has declined for many years due to depletion and a lack of development. 
The University Field was initially interpreted as a salt dome feature based on early gravity surveys and surface indications. However, salt has not been penetrated by the existing wells. The field does not appear to be a fault generated structure either, despite being located immediately south of the Baton Rouge Fault, a sub-regional contemporaneous growth fault with pronounced surface expression. 
The timing of the University Field structural development relative to that of the Baton Rouge Fault is key to interpreting the hydrocarbon migration history of the area. Previous studies suggest the Baton Rouge Fault is permeable to fluid flow, therefore, the fault may have captured only a small fraction of the migrating hydrocarbons available. The University Field, due to contemporaneous domal development, should have provided an ideal trap for migrating hydrocarbons. The large number of reservoirs present in University Field may provide insight into timing of structural development and episodes of hydrocarbon migration. A preliminary evaluation of the field geology shows potential for bypassed oil and gas accumulations.

 

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90026©2004 AAPG Annual Meeting, Dallas, Texas, April 18-21, 2004.