--> --> Abstract: Subsurface Geometry and Growth History of the Warfield Structure in South-Central West Virginia, Central Appalachian Basin, by D. Gao and R. C. Shumaker; #90984 (1994).

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Abstract: Subsurface Geometry and Growth History of the Warfield Structure in South-Central West Virginia, Central Appalachian Basin

Dengliang Gao, Robert C. Shumaker

The Warfield structure is located at the eastern margin of the Rome trough in south-central West Virginia, an intersection area between the 38th parallel and the Burning Springs lineaments in the central Appalachian basin. Using SURFACE III and MCS contouring packages, structure maps of upper Paleozoic horizons were completed by retrieving, editing, and contouring over 6000 shallow wells from the database of the DEAM (Data Editing and Management) software package. The Warfield anticline is horizontal at the Mississippian horizons, with a generally northeast-trending closure and a northwest-dipping axial plane, but at the Devonian level the closure is lost as the fold plunges northeastward. Structures from the Oriskany horizon to the basement were interpolated based on seismic and well data with a multisurface STACK procedure of the mcs package, and demonstrate a constrained half graben underneath the Warfield anticline with a systematic trend change between the east-west--trending 38th parallel and the north to south-trending Burning Springs lineaments. Based on preliminary results from subsurface mapping, digitization, and quantitative analysis of seismic time sections as well as computer modeling

for the magnetic/gravity anomalies, we postulate that the geometry and growth history of the Warfield structure were genetically controlled by a wedge-shaped basement fault system in which the strike-slip displacement along both the east-west--trending and the north-south--trending faults, and the dip-slip displacement on the northeast-trending faults occurred synchronously in response to the episodic movement of a wedge-shaped basement block bounded by the east-west--trending 38th parallel and the north-south--trending Burning Springs lineaments as well as the northeast-trending trough-margin faults throughout the Paleozoic.

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90984©1994 AAPG Annual Convention, East Lansing, Michigan, September 18-20, 1994