--> --> Abstract: Historic "Native" Water Well Data: A Valuable Source of Background Geohydrologic and Water Quality Data, by S. L. Werner; #90992 (1993).
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WERNER, SANFORD L., Consulting Geohydrologist-Engineer Geologist-Previous HitWaterNext Hit Previous HitQualityNext Hit Specialist, Canoga Park, CA

ABSTRACT: Historic "Native" Previous HitWaterNext Hit Well Data: A Valuable Source of Background Geohydrologic and Previous HitWaterNext Hit Previous HitQualityNext Hit Data

The application of historic Previous HitwaterNext Hit well data in any environmental study is a must to establish background or "native" ground Previous HitwaterNext Hit conditions, such as depth to and Previous HitqualityNext Hit of shallow groundwater. By 1900, thousands of Previous HitwaterNext Hit wells had been dug or drilled in southern California to depths of up to 300 ft or more. The present condition of most of these wells is unknown.

Historic "native" Previous HitwaterNext Hit well data is defined as that geohydrologic and Previous HitwaterNext Hit Previous HitqualityNext Hit data reported between 1900 and 1950 in the southern California area. Generally, this data is not readily accessible nor found in the microfiche files of public agencies. Historic data includes well description, location, and depth;

Previous HitwaterNext Hit levels; lithology and ground Previous HitwaterNext Hit Previous HitqualityNext Hit; etc. The Los Angeles-Orange County coastal plain is a part of southern California's vast groundwater system of major underlying aquifers, and an important source of Previous HitwaterNext Hit well production. Locally, it has been significantly contaminated from intense industrial development, especially the unconfined sediments and shallow groundwater of the Semiperched Aquifer which lie above the Bellflower Aquiclude.

With historic Previous HitwaterTop well data, the "reciprocal" of the Law of Uniformitarianism ("the present is the key to the past") has great application. That is, the past is the key to the present.

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90992©1993 AAPG Pacific Section Meeting, Long Beach, California, May 5-7, 1993.