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Relationship between Giant Field Data and Ultimate Recoverable Oil

By

M.K. Horn1

 

Search and Discovery Article #40236 (2007)

Posted May 12, 2007

 

1Tulsa, Oklahoma (m.horn@sbcglobal.net)

 

Introduction 

Parts of the following are an expanded and modified version of a two-part article in the Oil and Gas Journal, April 2 and April 8, 2007 (Horn, 2007). The objectives of the current study are threefold--to estimate:

  • a) the percentage of oil and gas found in giant fields (≥ 500 million barrels oil, ≥ 3 trillion cubic feet gas) as compared to the total ultimate global inventory;

  • b) percent contributions of the 20 largest oil fields and the 20 largest gas fields to the total global inventory; and

  • c) remaining percentages of conventional oil and gas.

These objectives are carried out by linking estimates of ultimate recoverable oil and gas made by industry experts over the last 60 years (Salvador, 2005) with current data on 945 giant fields (556 oil and 389 gas, Horn, 2003, modified).

 

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

uIntroduction

uOil recoverable

uGas recoverable

uReserves vs recovery

uConclusions

uReferences

uAppendices

  uAppendix 1

  uAppendix 2

  uAppendix 3

 

 

Ultimate Oil Recoverable / Giant Field  Relationships 

Table 1. Global ultimate oil recoverable estimates of Appendix 1 averaged by decade.

Table 2. Decade ultimate recoverable sums, giant oil fields (plus condensate from all giant fields). Derived from Horn (2003, modified).

Figure 1. Comparison of world ultimate oil recoverable estimates with decade giant oil field ultimates. All discoveries before and including decade 1940 are summed in decade 1940. Decade 2000 giant field data incorporates information through April, 2007.

Table 3. Percent giant oil field contributions to the decade global oil ultimate estimates.

Table 4. Percent contribution of the 20 largest (oil+condensate) fields as a percentage of the current world ultimate estimate of 2,918 billion barrels.

 

Estimates of the ultimate worldwide recovery of oil by industry experts over a 60-year span have been tabulated by Salvador (2005, Table 8.). With some minor modifications based on reducing ranges for a few entries to an average value, Salvador’s data are reproduced as Appendix 1. A further reduction of Salvador’s data is shown in Table 1: averages of the estimates are made in ten-year spans. Thus, for example, at the end of decade 1960, global experts, on the average, predicted that the ultimate oil recovery would be 2,268 billion barrels. Averaging the Salvador data in ten-year intervals is carried out in order to conform time-wise with giant field data, also presented in ten-year intervals (Table 2).  

A comparison of Tables 1 and 2 is graphed in Figure 1.  

The percent giant oil field contributions to the decade global oil ultimate values (Table 2 decade values divided by Table 1 decade values) are shown in Table 3. The range of values is 32.1% to 56.8%. The current value is 43.4%. 

Next, we look at the percent contribution of the 20 largest oil fields as a percentage of the current world estimate of 2,918 billion barrels. The results are shown in Table 4.

 

Ultimate Gas Recoverable / Giant Field  Relationships 

Table 5. Global ultimate gas recoverable estimates of Appendix 2 averaged by decade.

Table 6. Decade sums, giant gas fields. ultimate recoverable. Derived from (Horn, 2003, modified).

Figure 2. Comparison of world ultimate gas recoverable estimates with decade giant gas field ultimates. All discoveries before and including decade 1940 are summed in decade 1940. Decade 2000 giant field data incorporates information through November, 2006. Associated gas from all giant fields is included.

Table 7. Percent giant gas field contributions to the decade global gas ultimate estimates.

Table 8. The percent contribution of the 20 largest gas fields, as a percentage of the current world ultimate estimate of 14,271 tcf.

 

Estimates of the ultimate worldwide recovery of gas by industry experts over a 50-year span have also been tabulated by Salvador (2005, Table 13.). With some minor modifications based on reducing ranges for a few entries to an average value, Salvador’s data are reproduced as Appendix 2. A further reduction of Salvador’s data is shown in Table 5: averages of the estimates are made in ten-year spans. As with the oil estimates, this step is carried out in order to make Salvador’s (2005) data conform time-wise to giant field data, also presented in ten-year intervals (Table 6). 

A comparison of Tables 5 and 6 is graphed in Figure 2

The percent giant gas field contributions to the decade global gas ultimate values (Table 6 decade values divided by Table 5 equivalent decade values) are shown in Table 7.  

The percent contribution of the 20 largest gas fields as a percentage of the current world estimate of 14,271 tcf is shown in Table 8.

 

Comparing Present Reserves with Ultimate Recovery 

Appendix 3 is a country-by-country list of year 2006 oil and gas reserves. The list is based on averaging Oil and Gas Journal (December 18, 2006) and World Oil (September, 2006) sources. From the last line of Appendix 3, the current world total reserves are 1,158.805 billon barrels of oil and 5,983.2 trillion cubic feet of gas. 

From Table 1, the current ultimate recoverable oil estimate is 2,918 billion barrels. Therefore, the percentage of present oil reserves to ultimate oil is 39.7% (1,158.805/2,918).  

From Table 5, the current ultimate recoverable gas estimate is 14,271 tcf. Therefore, the percentage of present gas reserves to ultimate gas is 41.9% (5,983.2/14,271).

 

Conclusions 

  1. Based on current estimates, giant oil will contribute 43.4% to the worldwide ultimate recovery of oil (Table 3).

  2. Also based on current estimates, giant gas will contribute 45.2% to the worldwide ultimate recovery of gas (Table 7).

  3. Worldwide estimates of ultimate oil recovery have increased to 2,918 billion barrels currently from 2,046 billion barrels in the 1980’s (Table 1). Trend analysis is interpreted as indicating that the estimates are “stabilizing” about 2,600 billion barrels (Figure 1).

  4. Estimates of giant oil field ultimate recoverable appear to be “stabilizing” at about 1,200 billion barrels (Figure 1).

  5. The percent contribution of the 20 largest (oil+condensate) fields, as a percentage of the current world ultimate estimate of 2,918 billion barrels, is 14.9% (Table 4).

  6. Worldwide estimates of ultimate gas recovery have risen from about 9,676 tcf during decade 1980 to the present estimates of about 14,271 tcf (Table 5).  Trend analysis (Figure 2) indicates that the estimate will continue to rise in the future.

  7. Giant field ultimate gas recoverable appears to be “stabilizing” at about 6,000 tcf (Figure 2).

  8. The percent contribution of the 20 largest gas fields, as a percentage of the current world ultimate estimate of 14,271 tcf, is 20.5% (Table 8).

  1. The percentage of present oil reserves to estimated ultimate oil is about 40%. The percentage of present gas reserves to estimated ultimate gas is about 42%.

 

References 

Horn, M.K., 2003, Giant fields 1868-2003, Data on a CD-ROM, in M. Halbouty, ed., Giant oil and gas fields of the decade 1990-1999: AAPG Memoir 78, 340 p. Modified November 2006 in order to reflect giant oil discoveries 2000-2006.

Salvador, Amos, 2005, Energy: A historical perspective and 21st century forecast: AAPG Studies in Geology 54, p. 33-121. Tables 8 and 13.

Horn, M.K., 2007, Giant fields trends 1 and 2: Oil and Gas Journal, April 2, p. 36-39, and April 9, p. 35-37.

 

Appendices 

APPENDIX 1 (SALVADOR, 2005, TABLE 8)

 

 

 

ULTIMATE OIL ESTIMATES

 

 

 

DATE

SOURCE

 MMMBO

 

      AVG

1946

Pogue (Chase Manhattan Bank)

      605

 

 

1946

Duce (Aramco)

      500

 

 

1948

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

      610

 

 

1949

Levorsen (Stanford)

   1,635

 

        838

1950

Levorsen (Stanford)

   1,636

 

 

1950

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   1,100

 

 

1950

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   1,010

 

 

1953

MacNaughton, personal communication

   1,000

 

 

1956

Hubbert (Shell)

   1,250

 

 

1958

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   3,000

 

 

1959

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   3,500

 

     1,785

1961

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   3,500

 

 

1962

Hubbert (Shell)

   1,250

 

 

1963

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   2,000

 

 

1965

Hendricks (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,232

 

 

1967

Ryman (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

   2,090

 

 

1967

Royal Dutch Shell

   1,800

 

 

1968

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

   3,550

 

 

1969

Hubbert (U.S. Geological Survey)

   1,725

 

     2,268

1970

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

   3,550

 

 

1970

Moody (Mobil)

   1,800

 

 

1971

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

   3,650

 

 

1971

Warman (British Petroleum)

   2,000

 

 

1972

Linden (Institute of Gas Technology)

   2,945

 

 

1972

Moody and Emmerich (Mobil)

   1,850

 

 

1972

Warman (British Petroleum)

   1,800

 

 

1974

Parent and Linden (Institute of Gas Technology)

   3,500

 

 

1974

Kirby and Adams (British Petroleum)

   1,800

 

 

1975

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

   3,180

 

 

1975

Linden and Parent (Institute of Gas Technology)

   2,685

 

 

1975

National Academy of Sciences

   2,326

 

 

1975

Moody (consultant) and Esser (Mobil)

   2,015

 

 

1975

Moody (consultant) and Geiger (Mobil)

   2,000

 

 

1975

Moody (consultant)

   1,850

 

 

1975

MacKay (Bank of Montreal, Calgary)

   1,025

 

 

1976

Grossling (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,600

 

 

1976

Barthel et al. (West Germany Geological Survey)

   2,500

 

 

1977

Parent and Linden (Institute of Gas Technology)

   2,000

 

 

1977

World Energy Conference

   1,889

 

 

1977

Klemme (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

   1,550

 

 

1978

Desprairies (Institut Francais du Petrole)

   2,370

 

 

1978

Moody (consultant)

   2,030

 

 

1978

Nehring (Rand Corp.)

   2,000

 

 

1979

Wood (Cities Service)

   2,163

 

     2,283

1980

Schubert (World Energy Conference)

   2,600

 

 

1980

Roorda (Shell)

   2,400

 

 

1980

Halbouty and Moody (consultant)

   2,280

 

 

1980

Desprairies and Tissot (IFP)

   2,015

 

 

1980

Nehring (Rand Corp.)

   1,800

 

 

1981

Hubbert and Root (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,000

 

 

1982

Bois (IFP)

   2,600

 

 

1982

Nehring (Rand Corp.)

   1,800

 

 

1983

Riva (Library of Congress)

   1,953

 

 

1983

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   1,718

 

 

1984

Burollet (Total)

   2,213

 

 

1984

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   1,818

 

 

1985

Tanzil (consultant)

   2,594

 

 

1986

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   1,718

 

 

1986

 Ivanhoe (consultant)

   1,700

 

 

1987

Pecqueur (Elf Aquitaine)

   2,200

 

 

1987

 Roadifer (Mobil)

   2,000

 

 

1987

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   1,744

 

 

1988

Riva (Library of Congress)

   1,765

 

 

1989

Bookout (Shell)

   2,000

 

     2,046

1990

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,074

 

 

1991

Riva (Library of Congress)

   2,215

 

 

1991

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,079

 

 

1991

Campbell (consultant)

   1,650

 

 

1992

Miller (British Petroleum)

   4,000

 

 

1992

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,171

 

 

1993

Townes (independent petroleum geologist)

   2,800

 

 

1993

Miremadi and Ismail (OPEC)

   2,200

 

 

1994

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,272

 

 

1994

Laherre`re (Petroconsultants)

   1,800

 

 

1995

Campbell (consultant)

   1,650

 

 

1996

MacKenzie (World Resources Institute)

   2,200

 

 

1996

Campbell (consultant)

   1,750

 

 

1997

Edwards (University of Colorado)

   2,836

 

 

1997

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

   2,272

 

 

1997

Campbell (consultant)

   1,800

 

 

1997

Al-Jarri and Startzman (Texas A&M)

   1,760

 

 

1998

 Linden (Illinois Institute of Technology)

   4,000

 

 

1998

Schollnberger (Amoco)

   3,300

 

 

1998

Hiller (Hanover, Germany)

   2,220

 

 

1998

Campbell and Laherre`re (consultants)

   1,800

 

     2,326

2000

U.S. Geological Survey

   3,021

 

 

2001

Edwards (University of Colorado)

   3,210

 

 

2001

Odell

   3,000

 

 

2001

Deffeyes (Princeton)

   2,110

 

 

2002

Edwards (University of Colorado)

   3,251

 

     2,918

 


 

APPENDIX 2 (SALVADOR, 2005, TABLE 13)

 

 

ULTIMATE GAS ESTIMATES

 

 

DATE

SOURCE

 TCF

            AVG

1956

U.S. Department of Interior

        5,000

 

1958

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

        5,500

 

1959

Weeks (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

        6,000

           5,500

1961

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

        6,000

 

1962

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

      12,000

 

1962

 Hubbert (Shell)

        7,500

 

1965

Hendricks (U.S. Geological Survey)

      15,280

 

1967

Ryman (Standard Oil Co., New Jersey)

      12,000

 

1967

Royal Dutch Shell

      10,200

 

1968

Weeks (Weeks Petroleum Corp.)

        6,900

 

1968

World Energy Council–Survey of Energy Resources

        6,000

 

1969

Hubbert (U.S. Geological Survey)

      10,000

           9,542

1970

Weeks (Lewis G. Weeks Associates)

        6,900

 

1971

Weeks (Lewis G. Weeks Associates)

        7,200

 

1973

U.S. Federal Power Commission

      16,370

 

1973

Hubbert (U.S. Geological Survey)

      12,000

 

1975

Linden and Parent (Institute of Gas Technology)

        9,740

 

1975

Moody and Geiger (Mobil)

        8,164

 

1975

National Academy of Sciences

        7,821

 

1976

Adams and Kirkby (BP)

        6,000

 

1976

Barthel et al. (Bundersanstalt fur Geowissenschafteu und Rohstoffe)

        8,360

 

1976

Grossling (U.S. Geological Survey)

      19,600

 

1977

Kalisch and Wander (American Gas Association)

      10,510

 

1977

Parent and Linden (Institute of Gas Technology)

        9,350

 

1977

Whiting (Texas A&M University)

        7,000

 

1978

Despaires (Institut Francais du Petrole)

        7,800

 

1978

McCormick et al. (American Gas Association)

      11,430

 

1978

World Energy Council–Survey of Energy Resources

        9,980

           9,889

1980

World Energy Council–Survey of Energy Resources

      10,340

 

1980

Meyerhoff (Meyerhoff and Cox Inc.)

        7,670

 

1980

Parent (Institute of Gas Technology)

        8,550

 

1980

Roorda (Shell)

      10,200

 

1982

Bois (Institut Francais du Petrole)

      10,343

 

1982

Parent (Institute of Gas Technology)

        9,780

 

1983

Riva (Library of Congress)

      11,328

 

1983

Parent (Institute of Gas Technology)

        9,500

 

1984

Toens and Van der Merwe (Nuclear Development Corp., South Africa)

      10,167

 

1987

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

        9,280

 

1987

Pecqueur (Elf Aquitaine)

        8,750

 

1989

Bookout (Shell)

      10,200

           9,676

1990

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      10,679

 

1991

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      10,782

 

1992

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      10,512

 

1993

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      10,517

 

1994

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      11,568

 

1994

Global Gas Resources Workshop C.L. Ruthven, ed.

      14,490

 

1994

 Fisher (University of Texas)

      20,000

 

1995

Enron

      14,024

 

1997

Enron

      15,457

 

1997

Masters et al. (U.S. Geological Survey)

      11,568

 

1997

Edwards (University of Colorado)

      11,625

 

1998

Krylov et al. (various Russian institutions)

      14,124

 

1998

Appert (Cedigaz)

      15,890

         13,172

2000

U.S. Geological Survey

      15,401

 

2001

Edwards (University of Colorado)

      13,141

         14,271

______________________________________________________________________________________

APPENDIX 3 (WORLD OIL AND GAS RESERVES)

Derived from averaging Oil and Gas Journal and World Oil sources.

A. NORTH AMERICA

 

 

 

Canada

             8,613

55.8

           17,916

Mexico

           12,353

17.3

           15,229

United States

           21,479

198.7

           54,598

Others

 N.A

N.A

 N.A

Total

42,443.5

271.8

           87,743

 

 

 

 

B. CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA

 

 

 

Argentina

             2,449

18.7

             5,570

Barbados

                   3

0.0

                   4

Belize

                   7

0.0

                   7

Bolivia

               448

25.4

             4,673

Brazil

           11,849

11.3

           13,739

Chile

                 79

2.2

               445

Colombia

             1,453

5.4

             2,345

Cuba

               341

1.5

               596

Ecuador

             4,831

0.2

             4,860

Guatemala

83

0.0

                 83

Peru

               973

8.7

             2,427

Suriname

111

0.0

               111

Trinidad and Tobago

               672

18.8

             3,800

Venezuela

           80,012

152.4

         105,409

Other-Country Not Specified

 N.A

N.A

 N.A

Total

         103,310

244.6

         144,069

 

 

 

 

C. WESTERN EUROPE

 

 

 

Austria

                 62

0.7

               180

Denmark

             1,277

2.5

             1,701

France

               124

0.3

               181

Germany

               283

7.8

             1,584

Greece

                   5

0.04

                 11

Ireland

                   0

0.35

                 58

Italy

               684

5.9

             1,668

Netherlands

               163

50.3

             8,538

Norway

             7,941

82.8

           21,740

Spain

               151

0.1

               166

Turkey

               291

0.3

               336

United Kingdom

             3,813

17.4

             6,714

Other-Country Not Specified

 no data

no data

 no data

Total

           14,723

168.5

           42,813

 

 

 

 

D. EASTERN EUROPE AND FORMER USSR

 

 

 

Albania

               197

0.1

               214

Azerbaijan

             7,000

0.04

             7,006

Belarus

               198

0.04

               204

Bulgaria

                   8

0.1

                 31

Croatia

                 69

1.1

               244

Czech Republic

                 19

0.1

                 42

FSU - Rissian Federation

           67,200

1684.4

         347,929

FSU - others (see individual federations)

 N.A.

N.A.

 N.A.

Georgia

                 35

0.04

                 41

Hungary

                 74

1.3

               286

Kazakhstan

           30,000

0.04

           30,006

Kyrgyzstan

                 40

0.04

                 46

Lithuania

                 12

0.04

                 18

Poland

               186

5.5

             1,099

Romania

               524

3.4

             1,082

Serbia

                 78

0.04

                 83

Slovakia

                   9

0.04

                 15

Tajikstan

                 12

0.04

                 18

Turkmenistan

               600

0.04

               606

Ukraine

               395

0.04

               401

Uzbekistan

               594

0.04

               600

Other-Country Not Specified

 no data

no data

 no data

Total

         112,224

2040.8

         452,351

 

 

 

 

E. MIDDLE EAST

 

 

 

Abu Dhabi

           92,200

0.04

           92,206

Bahrain

               126

0.04

               131

Dubai

             4,000

0.04

             4,006

Iran

         133,885

969.5

         295,468

Iraq

         115,000

98.0

         131,333

Israel

                   2

0.04

                   8

Jordan

                   0

0.04

                   6

Kuwait

           98,750

53.8

         107,708

Neutral Zone

             4,875

4.5

             5,625

Oman

             5,145

28.5

             9,900

Qatar

           17,777

908.3

         169,152

Ras al Kaimah

               100

0.04

               106

Saudi Arabia

         259,800

239.5

         299,717

Sharjah

             1,500

0.04

             1,506

Syria

             2,750

10.6

             4,522

United Arab Emirates

N.A.

N.A.

 N.A.

Yemen

             2,985

17.0

             5,810

Other-Country Not Specified

N.A.

N.A.

 N.A.

Total

738,894.1

2,329.85

      1,127,203

 

 

 

 

F. AFRICA

 

 

 

Algeria

           11,810

161.2

           38,678

Angola

             8,525

3.0

             9,025

Benin

                   8

0.04

                 15

Cameroon

               400

3.9

             1,050

Chad

             1,500

0.0

             1,500

Congo (Former Zaire)

               180

0.0

               186

Congo (Brazzaville)

             1,753

3.7

             2,365

Egypt

             3,705

62.7

           14,150

Equatorial Guinea

             1,453

2.4

             1,844

Ethiopia

                   0

0.88

               147

Gabon

             2,073

1.3

             2,281

Ghana

                 15

0.80

               148

Ivory Coast

               100

1.00

               267

Libya

           37,757

52.1

           46,436

Mauritania

               100

1.00

               267

Morocco

                   1

0.06

                 11

Mozambique

                  -  

4.50

               750

Namibia

                  -  

2.20

               367

Nigeria

           36,698

181.95

           67,023

Rwanda

                  -  

2.00

               333

Somaila

                  -  

0.20

                 33

South Africa

15.0

0.0

                 15

Sudan

             5,701

2.00

             6,034

Tanzania

0

0.23

                 38

Tunisia

               545

3.1

             1,062

Other-Country Not Specified

N.A

N.A

 N.A

Total

112,338

490.12

         194,026

 

 

 

 

G. ASIA AND OCEANIA

 

 

 

Afghanistan

                   0

0.04

                   6

Australia

             2,803

74.9

           15,293

Bangladesh

                 28

0.04

                 34

Brunei

             1,103

12.9

             3,253

China

           16,094

67.8

           27,395

China, Taiwan

                   2

0.04

                   8

India

             4,802

32.6

           10,237

Indonesia

             4,663

94.6

           20,436

Japan

                 59

0.04

                 64

Malaysia

             2,946

66.5

           14,029

Myanmar

               125

11.3

             2,013

New Zealand

                 64

1.4

               303

Pakistan

               299

29.1

             5,140

Papua New Guinea

               214

13.0

             2,372

Philippines

               129

2.7

               574

Thailand

               612

18.8

             3,750

Viet Nam

               973

7.5

             2,223

Other-Country Not Specified

 no data

no data

 no data

Total

           34,872

437.6

         107,804

 

 

 

 

WORLD TOTAL

      1,158,805

5983.2

      2,156,008

 

 

 

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