Datapages, Inc.Print this page

ALEMAN, ANTENOR M., Amoco Production Company, Houston, TX

ABSTRACT: Tectono-Stratigraphic Evolution of the Canete Basin, Lima, Peru, A Plate Tectonic Model for the Mesozoic Evolution of the Central Andes

An arc-trench system has been active in the Central Andes since at least since Late Triassic. This Mesozoic margin was characterized by subduction-erosion processes, PreMesozoic metamorphic outer basement high, pervasive extension, tectonic inversion, sporadic igneous activity and segmentation of the arc. Episodic variations in the tectonic evolution of the associated basins were controlled by the variable angle of subduction, age of the subducted plate, rate and angle of convergence, and the relative motion of the Farallon and South America Plates. The Canete Basin is an elongate frontal arc basin, subparallel to the arc, which documents the early evolution of the Andean Orogeny.

In the Canete Basin, the oldest arc volcanism is documented by the interbedded tuffs, lava flows and tuffaceous marine shales of the Late Jurassic Puente Piedra Group which was deposited along a series of isolated and elongated troughs that formed adjacent to the arc. During Late Berriasian the arc subsided and the lithofacies changed from arc to continental derived lithologies. The shallow marine, quartz rich Morro Solar Group was derived from the uplifted metamorphic basement high in the west, as the result of ensialic extension. Locally, volcanic quiescence was interrupted by deposition of the volcaniclastic rich Pucusana Formation.

The Late Hauterivian to Aptian Lima Group consists of lime mudstones, shales and subordinated gypsum and bioclastic limestones intertonguing with volcaniclastic and lava flow facies of the Chilca Group. Stratigraphic relationship rapid changes in thickness and facies of this unit document the development of an incipient arc and the persistence of ensialic extension prior to the maximum paroxysm of volcanic activity of the overlying Albian to Cenomanian Chillon Group. Interbedded volcaniclastic sandstones, lava flows, hyaloclastic breccias and tuffaceous shales of the Chillon Group were coeval with the early phases of emplacement of the Coastal Batholith (CB).

Tectonic inversion took place during the Albian Mochica Phase of the Andean Orogeny which is characterized by NE trending open folds associated with steep axial plane cleavage and emplacement of syntectonic, foliated, basic intruslons. The Late Cretaceous Peruvian phase of the Andean Orogeny, concomitant with Mesozoic emplacement of the CB account for the initial uplifting of the Coastal Ranges.

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #90988©1993 AAPG/SVG International Congress and Exhibition, Caracas, Venezuela, March 14-17, 1993.