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ABSTRACT: Geologic Significance of the Deep test at SNORT #1, Indian Wells Valley, Kern County, California

MONASTERO, F. C., A. K. KATZENSTEIN, S. B. BJORNSTAD, K. R. BONIN, SR., and J. R. NEFFEW, U.S. Navy, China Lakes, CA

In September 1991, a basement test well was drilled in SW 1/4, Sec. 24, T25S, R39E, in the middle of the Indian Wells Valley. The well encountered basement at 7394 ft and was completed to 7424 ft with 4.5-in. casing. The bottom 30 ft of the hole was cored with a 25% return.

Basement is altered granitic rock with biotite converted to chlorite and other black minerals totally altered to hematite. Some potassic alteration of feldspars was found as well as abundant fracturing with mylonite on the fractures. Slickensides are also visible on all fracture surfaces.

Temperature logs run after four days indicate an unequilibrated bottom hole temperature of 240 degrees F. Additional logs will be run in early January 1992 after the well has reached thermal equilibrium.

As the deepest well in the Indian Wells Valley by more than 5000 ft, the results of this well have extreme significance in interpreting the mode of formation of both the Sierra Nevada and the Indian Wells Valley itself. These results will be discussed in that context and in the context of further development of geothermal resources in the area.

 

AAPG Search and Discovery Article #91016©1992 AAPG-SEPM-SEG-EMD Pacific Section Meeting, Sacramento, California, April 27-May 1, 1992 (2009)